tamazo2:

リバーサイドながら(1979~1980)
大阪市北区
2014

tamazo2:

リバーサイドながら(1979~1980)

大阪市北区

2014

virtualkee:

Mandala Universe | Prints +

virtualkee:

Mandala Universe | Prints +

dribbblepopular:

Explosion Original: http://ift.tt/1o4RbSr
(via ERTH I Art Print by Graphmob | Society6)

artchipel:

Romain Jacquet-Lagreze (b.1987, France) - Vertical Horizon, Hong Kong (2014)

Romain Jacquet-Lagrèze is a French photographer born in France. He grew up in Paris suburbs until he moved abroad in 2008. Originally dedicated to visual art, his interest in photography started to prevail after his arrival in Hong Kong. Living in the heart of Kowloon since 2009, he directly felt bond to this place unique for its density and vibrancy. His first attempt of recording his new home took the form of the project Vertical Horizon released in 2012 as a photo book. It has been featured in major publications in UK, France, Spain, USA, China and Hong Kong. The photo book has been then reprinted as a second edition in 2014. Romain is currently working on his newer photography projects focused on Hong Kong and the several aspects of its unmatched urban development.

© All images courtesy of the artist

[more Romain Jacquet-Lagreze | artist found at Co.Design]

(via Rorschach Art Print by Alter Ego | Society6)

likeafieldmouse:

Dan Holdsworth - Blackout (2010)

"…Iceland’s southern landscape, a place dominated by glaciers permeated with so much basalt-black dust and grit as to be dark, not light. In this harsh, vast landscape where tectonic plates rip the earth’s surface violently apart and volcanic ash and glaciers collide, the detritus of the past is literally frozen into the present.

These glaciers are, however, rapidly melting away, an event which acts as a powerful quantifier of the environmental conditions of our time.

Inspired by the 1965 New York blackout, this series sees Holdsworth execute a double inversion, making black glaciers white to craft an alter-reality within the negative frame. This is a modern measure of time, a phenomenological encounter in which distortion of light heightens the other senses, disrupts awareness of duration, and compels us engage with the world in an entirely new way. His decision to abstract an already incomprehensible terrain enhances its alien qualities: black skies and a landscape that appears illuminated from within portray a place that is, geologically and conceptually, more akin to a lunar landscape than our own planet.

These images are a digital rendering of the technological sublime, documents of a planetary surface that confront us with the Other, shifting perspective and forcing us to see ourselves anew.”